Tag Archives: 319 Wine $ Cheese Shoppe

Sweet Stuff: Desserts in TLH

How sweet.  Summer has officially begun. What  a perfect time to indulge in fruity sorbets, luscious shortcake and over-the-top ice cream sundaes.

In Tallahassee, you can find all these treats, and lots more, whether you’re craving a gooey banana split with hot butter caramel, a pot of chocolate fondue or a refreshing chai crème brûlée. And you don’t have to miss out if you’re vegan or eat a gluten-free diet.

Our search for desserts led to ice cream and candy shops, bakeries, restaurants and even late-night delivery services. Friends and readers contributed their ideas as well, but if we’ve missed your favorite spot, let us know.

Here’s the scoop…

COOL TREATS

Big Easy Snowballs: It’s always snowball season at these two dessert shops, which create frozen treats using New Orleans-style machines. You have a choice of more than 90 flavors including the popular blue raspberry or tiger’s blood (three berries with a hint of coconut). The specialty is a “stuffed” snowball – any flavor with French vanilla soft serve ice cream in the middle. 1621 N Monroe St. (Lake Ella), 850-329-6010; 2819 Mahan Dr., 850- 999-1502.

Bruster’s Real Ice Cream: Wedding Cake ice cream, made with almond cake batter, and Tuxedo Strawberry, with white chocolate swirls, are the special June flavors at these two counter-serve spots, where you’ll find waffle cones, freezes, milkshakes, sundaes, ice cream and pies. Bring your own banana to Bruster’s on Thursdays and you get a banana split for half price ($3 instead of $6). 2475 Apalachee Pkwy., 850-309-0712; 1709 W. Tharpe St., 850-383-9782.

Cold Stone Creamery: Pick your favorite ice cream flavor, choice of mix-ins and it’s all melded together using two spades on a frozen granite stone, for a made-to-order confection. Centre of Tallahassee, 2415 N Monroe St., 850-553-4560; 1444 W Tennessee St., 850-425-1150.

Dairy Queen: There are three Dairy Queen shops in Tallahassee plus a spot in the Governor’s Square Mall, offering chocolate and vanilla soft-serve in a cup or cone plus varied Blizzard treats.

Fiocco at Urban Food Market: Rudy Sacchet’s family has been making gelato for more than three generations in the Dolomites in northeastern Italy, and now he’s sharing his experience at Fiocco Gelato Cafe in the sprawling Urban Food Market. Fiocco offers more than 20 flavors plus coffee drinks and bakery items, including cheesecake from Chef Alessandro Di Maggio of +39. Centre of Tallahassee, 2415 N Monroe St.; 850-765-9842.

Isabella Pizza: Along with Neapolitan pies and salads, Isabella’s offers six flavors of house-made gelato and Nutella pizza, which is stuffed with the hazelnut spread and topped with fruit. 799 W Gaines St.; 850-558-6379.

Lofty Pursuits: The venerable local ice cream shop, from owner Gregory Cohen, is a place where customers like to hang out. Watch Victorian-style candy made in-house on equipment from the late 1800s and check out retro toys and games. The ice cream menu itself is huge, offering floats, freezes, egg creams, ice cream sodas, nearly three dozen sundaes (not counting banana confections and treats like the kitchen sink, with 26 scoops in a stainless steel sink) and vegan ice cream options. Lofty Pursuits makes more than 30 syrups. Want dessert for breakfast? Order a pancake with candy, sprinkles and ice cream (regular breakfast items available as well). 1355 Market St.; 850-521-0091.

Mr. Cool: The Thai-style ice cream shop serves ice cream in six tight rolls instead of scoops. Servers mash mix-ins and a liquid ice cream base (including a basic version, vanilla, coffee, green tea or chocolate) on a pan chilled to a temperature of minus 14 degrees, then scrape the mixture into rolls, which taste a little lighter than a scoop. Pick one of the restaurant’s combos, like the Monkey Business (with bananas and Nutella) or create your own. Once the ice cream is rolled, pick three toppings. There’s one price: $5.99. 633 W Tennessee St.; 850-999-8476.

Nuberri Frozen Yogurt: The shop, with three locations, is primarily known for self-serve frozen yogurt (with no fat and low fat alternatives) but it also serves custard, gelato, sorbet and Italian ices. Dozens of toppings are available.

Peterbrooke Chocolatier: Satisfy your craving for chocolate or gelato (or both) at Peterbroke, which offers a cup, cone or pint of gelato, with 16 rotating flavors. 1817 Thomasville Rd. 850-577-3111.

Yogurt Mountain:   The yogurt shop serves more than 16 choices with nonfat, lowfat and gluten-free picks available, plus custard, dairy-free choices and tropical ice. 1801 W Tennessee St.; 850-765-0229.

CUPCAKES/PASTRIES

Au Peche Mignon: Feel like you’re in France (we can all pretend) while gobbling macarons, croissants and other pastries at the cafe, open more than 25 years. You can also get imported cheeses, salami and lunch. 1415 Timberlane Rd.; 850-668-5533.

Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery: The local cupcake shop from owners Jean Bates and Paula Lucas, offers about a dozen cupcake varieties daily, plus macarons, cookies and cake balls (mini cupcakes available by special order). Gluten-free and vegan options are available. During the summer, cupcakes are $2 on Tuesdays. 1000 Thomasville Rd.; 850-765-0374.

Smallcakes Cupcakery and Creamery: The colorful cupcake shop serves more than a dozen flavors daily. You can special order medium or mini cupcakes and get cupcakes for dogs on Saturdays. 1480 Apalachee Pkwy., 850-765-2785; 3479 Thomasville Rd., 850-999-1943.

Tasty Pastry: The family-run bakery, which originated in 1963, is still run by siblings and certified master bakers Debbie and Mark Cross. It’s the source for breads, cakes, pies, cookies, bagels, pastries and take-home casseroles. 1355 Market St.; 850-893-3752.

The Cake Shop: The bakery is brimming with breads, pastries presents pies, cheesecakes, cookies, brownies, baklava, quiche and specialty baked goods.. Open for breakfast. 1908 Capital Circle NE; 850-386-2253.

Treva’s Pastries and Fine Foods: In her small shop and cafe, Treva Pasquarelli offers soups, salads, sandwiches, entrees (to go) and pastries. Her specialties include Key lime mousse pie and blueberry almond croissants. She also makes ice cream for sale by the cup or pint. 2766 Capital Circle NE; 850-765-0811.

RESTAURANTS

Blu Halo: Popular desserts at the upmarket restaurant include flavored nitrogen ice creams. The chilling temperature of nitrogen renders ice cream velvety and rich. Other signature treats are blueberry cheesecake with Kahlúa chocolate sauce and Nutella soufflé or splurge or a dessert cocktail. 3431 Bannerman Rd.; 850-999-1696.

Cypress Restaurant: Pastry chef Maria Mosca and executive chef/owner David Gwynn create a changing menu of gourmet desserts. Highlights include a decadent flourless chocolate cake with chocolate ganache; a bread pudding made of cornbread infused with maple syrup and topped with bourbon ice cream; and chai crème brûlée. The menu also features house-made ice creams and sorbets (including vegan and gluten-free). 320 E. Tennessee St.; 850-513-1100.

Food Glorious Food: Fans rave about the three-layer, sinfully rich “Perfect Chocolate Cake” but other favorite desserts at Food Glorious Food include Key lime pound cake and baklava cheesecake. 1950 Thomasville Rd.; 850-224-9974.

Habana’s Boardwalk: Savor Cuban desserts like flan (caramelized vanilla custard), tres leches (vanilla cake soaked with three milks), churros con helado (fried dough and ice cream topped with cinnamon sugar) and guava and cream cheese empanada at this homey restaurant. 2819 Mahan Dr.; 850-391-9111.

– Kool Beanz

Kool Beanz: Pastry chef Sylvia Gould is known for her imaginative desserts on a constantly changing menu. Her specialties include toasted coconut cream meringue cake, blueberry fig crostata and Thai basil panna cotta. 921 Thomasville Rd.; 850-224-2466.

The Melting Pot: Fondue lovers head to The Melting Pot for this chocolate treat (with several liqueur options for added decadence), served with numerous toppings including fruit and more chocolate. 2727 N Monroe St.; 850-386-7440.

Miccosukee Root Cellar: Owner Ruben Fields presents a menu of locally-sourced foods, much of it organic, and that includes dessert. Summer favorites feature a chocolate terrine with Thai basil ice cream, bay leaf pound cake with a strawberry lavender compote, and a pecan pie made with nuts from KBH Farms. Try house-made ice cream flavors like strawberry balsamic, Turkey Hill Farm sugar cane syrup ice cream and buttermilk crème fraîche. 1311 Miccosukee Rd.; 850-597-7419.

– 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe

319 Wine & Cheese: This local cafe, owned by Bill and Lynne Edwards, features house-made cannoli, triple layer chocolate merlot cake, blueberry tarts, apple caramel bread pudding with ice cream and lots more. 6265 Old Water Oak Rd.; 850-765-7053.

DELIVERIES

Dipped:  If you’re craving chocolate-covered strawberries (and who doesn’t?), this place delivers. Cheesecake and other gourmet treats, including S’more truffles, Belgian waffles and bacon, delivered until 3 a.m. (call to check their delivery area). 2401 Pensacola St.; 850-296-7489.

Insomnia Cookies: Insomnia delivers cookies, ice cream and milk to fans anywhere within three miles of its Tennessee Street location to 3 a.m. 1525 W. Tennessee St.; 877-632-6654.

Z Baked: Find cookies and muffins as well as some comfort food, which you can pick up or get delivered (if you’re in their coverage area). Order online at zbaked.com. 2401 W. Pensacola St., 850-391-2206.

 

Bread, Wine and Romance

For that perfect date night, lovebirds are eager to find the ideal destination for dinner. As Omar Khayyám said, it’s all about “A loaf of bread, a jug of wine, and thou.”

To help your search, here are a dozen destinations with the right recipe for bread, wine and romance. Just make reservations early, and let love take its course.

+39
Sensual Italian cuisine, attentive service and cozy ambience add up to a special dining experience at +39, nestled inside the sprawling Urban Food Market in the Centre of Tallahassee. Open only five months, the white tablecloth restaurant showcases elegant dishes prepared by chef Alessandro Di Maggio (including his sinfully good cheesecake).
The Centre of Tallahassee, 2415 N Monroe St.; 850-536-6843.

319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe
Owners Lynne and Bill Edwards have created a warm, inviting atmosphere that gives this charming bistro a touch of romance. On Valentine’s Day, they’re presenting a three-course, $75 home-cooked dinner prepared by Lynne plus a bottle of I Heart California wine (cabernet or sauvignon blanc). The final touch: music by local singer Bobby Anhalt. 6265 Old Water Oak Rd.; 850-765-7053.

A la Provence
Savor French-Mediterranean cuisine by candlelight at classic A la Provence. You can count on gracious service, an extensive wine list

Joe Rondone / Tallahassee Democrat

(plus full bar) and a quiet atmosphere to help set the mood. The pièce de résistance: additions like chateaubriand and lobster for Valentine’s Day. 1415 Timberlane Rd.; 850-329-6870.

Clusters & Hops
Clusters & Hops has long attracted locals with its unconventional mash-up of restaurant and retail. Gourmet goodies (wine, beer, cheese, sausages, chocolate) are up front, The petite cafe and bar are in the back. With dim lights, soft music and a laid-back vibe, it’s well-suited to romance. Chef/owner Kent Steels features European-style dishes like baked eggplant lavosh, ostrich and osso buco plus more than 1,000 wine choices. One option: You can pick a wine off the shelf and pay the retail price with an $8.50 corkage fee. 707 N. Monroe St., 850-222-2669.

Cypress Restaurant
A special-occasion favorite, Cypress serves elegant renditions of Southern-inspired regional cuisine in a sophisticated setting with romantic lighting, accommodating staff and a friendly bar. Vibrant paintings by local artists add a creative spin. Along with its regular menu on Valentine’s Day, Cypress will offer a three-course meal for $45 and five courses for $65 with wine pairing options. 320 East Tennessee St.; 850-513-1100.

Essence of India
Spice up your Valentine’s Day with aromatic Indian cuisine served in an exotic setting with glistening chandeliers, long gold curtains and deep coral hues. The soothing space specializes in the food of North India, including breads and dishes cooked in a tandoor (clay oven), and there’s a full bar. For an adventurous feast, share a thali dinner for two. Parkway Center, 1105 Apalachee Pkwy.; 850-656-7200.

Food Glorious FoodThe place has a hidden-away, romantic feel. Adorned with modern artwork, the sleek restaurant features internationally inspired dishes (that change weekly), including more than a dozen small plates, creative cocktails and decadent desserts made in-house. 1950 Thomasville Rd.; 850-224-7279.

Little Italy
Who doesn’t sigh at the memory of the romantic spaghetti and meatball scene in Disney’s “Lady and the Tramp?” Share the love, and generous plates of red-sauced favorites, at this homey Italian restaurant owned by Enver Sulollari and his wife Vjollca for 30 years. The place isn’t fancy but it’s warm, welcoming and wallet-friendly. 111 S Magnolia Dr.; 850-878-7781.

Nefetari’s Fine Cuisine & Spirits
Make your sweetheart queen (or king) for a day at this opulent destination, which promises diners a “royal experience” (There is actually a queen’s table here). What’s more, the one-of-a-kind setting, decorated with Egyptian and African art, showcases a
globe-trotting menu that includes an Ethiopian stew platter, Caribbean jerk and pad Thai. Owners Sharon and Dana Dennard make all customers feel like nobility. 812 S. Macomb St.; 850-210-0548.

Sage
Terry White (named “King of American Seafood” at 2014’s Great American Seafood Cook-Off) presents a sophisticated menu served in a comfortably classy space decorated with local art — or dine in the landscaped patio. White is preparing a three-course menu for Valentine’s Day in addition to the regular menu, which includes escargot, Scottish salmon and beef tenderloin. 3534 Maclay Blvd. South; 850-270-9396.

Shula’s 347
Snuggle in the large, private booths at this traditional steakhouse, ensconced in the Hotel Duval. After a meal of steaks, chops or seafood, zip upstairs to Level 8, the city’s only rooftop lounge, for a cocktail and view of downtown Tallahassee under the stars. 415 North Monroe St.; 850-224-6005.

Z,Bardhi’s Italian Cuisine
Devoted diners praise the traditional Italian fare and warm atmosphere of Z. Bardhi’s, a local favorite for two decades. If the weather cooperates, the lovely patio is best for courting, with white tablecloths, candlelight and landscaping. 3596 Kinhega Dr.; 850-894-9919

Rochelle Koff writes about food and dining at TallahasseeTable.com. Reach her at TallahasseeTable@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

Food trends for 2017

The New Year is still young, but food pundits have already been consulting their culinary crystal balls, predicting what we can expect to find on our plates in 2017.

Predicting trends for the New Year is precarious business. As the New York Times pointed out in a December article on food forecasting, “the practice is more art than science, often based on not much more than noting what is already percolating in big cities.” True perhaps, but it’s still fun to speculate.

Tallahassee Table consulted lists from foodie sources like Whole Foods, the National Restaurant Association, Pinterest, Bon Appétit magazine, the James Beard Foundation and some local chefs and farmers for ideas about what to expect in markets and restaurants in 2017.

What will be the new kale or quinoa? Will we fall in love with spelt or jackfruit? What will be the food of the year in Tallahassee? Tacos have been dominating the local restaurant scene and we don’t yet see that trend diminishing.

Tallahassee is not San Francisco or South Florida. We have our own tastes and our own pace. But here are nine trends to keep in mind. Only time will tell if any of them stick.

Ancient grains: Now that we’ve finally learned to pronounce quinoa (keen-wah is acceptable), more ancient grains are gaining attention,

Amaranth, an ancient grain.

including kamut, spelt, amaranth, lupin and teff, the latter popular in Ethiopian cooking.

Cauliflower or maybe kalettes: While it’s tough to top the ubiquitous power food, kale, the James Beard Foundation has said cauliflower is providing lots of competition, with its mild flavor, “blank canvas” and versatility. Another option: kalettes, a new vegetable that combines the flavors of Brussels

The lowly cauliflower is on the rise.

sprouts and kale. Collard greens are also moving beyond soul food menus. Tallahassee’s Backwoods Crossing, for instance, is serving pork sliders topped with collard greens.

Charcuterie: What’s old is new again. Don’t dig out the fondue pot just yet, but charcuterie at least appears to be making a comeback. The popular serving of cured meats is on the list of menu items that will impact sales in the year ahead, compiled by The National Restaurant Association, which surveyed nearly 1,300 professional chefs who are members of the American Culinary Federation. House-made charcuterie was named a hot trend by 69 percent of the chefs surveyed. We’ve seen more charcuterie in the

A charcuterie plate at 319 Wine $ Cheese Shoppe.

past year, with restaurants like Tallahassee’s 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe and Fifth & Thomas pairing meats with a variety of cheeses and condiments. The big-city trend of making charcuterie in-house may not take off, but local restaurants are buying meats from butchers or markets and serving charcuterie their way.

Creative condiments: Whole Foods Market predicts more interesting condiments will shake up the culinary scene this year, including black sesame tahini, habanero jam, ghee (a type of clarified butter used in Indian cuisine), black garlic, dae syrup and beet salsa. But before we embrace Mexican hot chocolate spread, “I want people to fall in love with parsley,” said Katie Harris, manager of Full Earth Farm in Quincy. “It’s so underrated and so much more than a garnish. It’s one of the most awesome herbs that’s super good for you, good for your blood. It tastes good and has a lot of nutritional value.” Parsley’s health benefits may surprise you, especially if you’ve been picking it off your plate as a nonessential food. It’s considered an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin C and beta carotene, which is an antioxidant that can help protect the body against free-radical damage and fight the effects of aging. It’s also a good source of vitamin A, folate and iron.

Delivery, please: Bon Appétit magazine sees an increase in delivery-only services. With our large college population in Tallahassee, it’s not hard to imagine a demand for such services here. Penny Delivers and Doorstep Delivery are two popular examples in Tallahassee though their clients go beyond students. Hospital employees, office workers and families are among the customers who want delivery services, said Christin Wright, manager of Doorstep Delivery in Tallahassee. The delivery service UberEats has become more popular in big cities but hasn’t yet made it to Tallahassee.

Jazzed about jackfruit: Pinterest is touting the nutritious as a pork substitute. You’ll just have to get past the stinky aroma. Using jackfruit as a vegan option has gone up 420 percent in 2016, according to Pinterest. Tallahassee’s Sweet Pea Cafe, a farm-to-table vegan/vegetarian restaurant, has been increasingly using jackfruit, particularly in tacos, nachos, burritos and barbecue, said restaurant staffer Whitney Corkowski. “We use it like a pork substitute. It has a pulled pork consistency,” Corkowski said. “We may cut it with tofu.” But what’s trendy at Sweet Pea, she said, is always “what’s in season.”

Pizza possibilities: This trend uses naan, India’s pillowy flatbread, as

Homemade naan pizza.

a canvas for your favorite pizza ingredients. You can pick up naan at the grocery store and create your own combinations. Pinterest calls it a top trend for the new year.

Passion for purple: As more consumers grow interested in farm-to-table products, more restaurants and home cooks are discovering vegetables they may have overlooked in the past. Whole Foods notes that purple foods are “popping up everywhere.” These include purple cauliflower, purple asparagus, elderberries, acai, purple potatoes and purple corn. The trend also reflects nutritional recommendations for a

A medley of purple foods: carrots, potatoes, potato chips.

rainbow diet. Deeply colored fruits and vegetables tend to have more vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Fifth & Thomas chef Zach Burton said he has been serving purple carrots and kohlrabi, an odd-looking member of the cabbage family with a sweet but peppery profile, that he buys from Full Earth Farm.

Sous vide anyone? This cooking technique (pronounced sue-veed), referring to cooking “under vacuum,” isn’t new, but more home cooks are trying it out and Pinterest predicts its popularity will rise in 2017. The method uses a vacuum-sealed plastic pouch that you place in a temperature-controlled water bath for longer cooking times. The method enables cooks to use less expensive cuts of meat to create tender steaks. Don’t let the fancy name scare you off.

Whatever 2017 brings in the way of food trends, we’ve come a long way from basic meat and potatoes.

 

 

What’s cooking

Here are a few food and dining events this month in Tallahassee and nearby.

 

Pumpkin patches:  There’s still time to stop by one of the many pumpkin patches in the city before Halloween.  Choices include  Faith Presbyterian Church, 2200 N. Meridian Rd. , 850.385.6151; Tallahassee Heights United Methodist Church, 3004 Mahan Dr., 850.877.6276;  and Pumpkins by King, 1481 Timberlane Rd.  For a longer list, visit  fun4tallykids.com/Whats-Happening/Pumpkin-Patches/

2017 Million Muggle March:  Get in the spirit of Halloween with the Harry Potter bar crawl with Madison Social, the Brass Tap, GrassLands Brewing Company and Proof Brewing Company. Registration at Township. when you purchase your ticket you will have to choose a house. Your ticket will include a shirt representative of the house you chose and and drink at each location (yes, one of them will be butterbeer). Township – The Great Hall; Madison Social – Gryffindor; The Brass Tap – Hufflepuff; GrassLands Brewing Company – Slytherin; Proof Brewing Company – Ravenclaw Tickets $25 to $30.
When: 6 p.m. Oct. 28
Where: Madison Social, 705 S. Woodward Ave.
Web: facebook.com/events/

Tallahassee Chopped Junior Event: Young wannabe chefs  ages 9 to 17 will be able to compete for a chance to be a contestant on the Food Network’s  Chopped Junior TV show by entering  the Tallahassee Chopped Junior Competition and Silent Auction Event on Oct. 29. The event is hosted by Whole Child Leon, which addresses critical issues affecting young children and their families. Winners will be  flown to New York City to audition with the show’s executive producer and casting director. Fifty competitors at Tallahassee’s event will be divided into two categories — ages 9 to 13 and 14 to 17. The chefs  will create their own original dish made from a set list of ingredients.. Guests at the event will watch competitors,  have a sampling of  hors d’oeuvres from local chefs and cocktails, be able to bid in the silent auction and vote on their favorite dishes by local restaurants.  Tickets are $30  for ages 17 and under, $50 adult general admission, $100 VIP sponsors, $1,000 VIP When:  5 to 8 p.m. Oct. 29
Where: The Moon, 1105 E Lafayette St.
Web:  wholechildleon.org/

Sunday brunch: The 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe  is offering a Sunday brunch with items like stuffed berry and nutella French toast, poached eggs and frittata (items can change). Kids eat free.
When:  10 a.m. Sundays through  Nov. 26
Where: 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe, 6265 Old Water OakRoad
Web: 319wineandcheese.com

Seven Days of Local Delights: The event, which  kicks off Oct. 30, celebrates the area’s small farms. During the week, several restaurants will be offering locally-grown menu specials and you’ll have the chance to attend  workshops and community events. Participating restaurants include Cypress RestaurantChop House on the BricksDamfino’s Cafe & MarketEl CocineroKool Beanz CafeLiam’s Restaurant, Lounge & Cheese ShoppeLiberty Bar. Miccosukee Root CellarSage: A RestaurantTupelo’s Bakery & Cafe319 Wine & Cheese ShoppeSweet Pea CafeSweet Grass Dairy and Vertigo Burgers & Fries. Proceeds support the Red Hills Small Farm Alliance, a nonprofit committed to growing small farms and supporting the local food network. See the website for all events.
When:  Oct. 30 through Nov. 5
Where: Several locations throughout Tallahassee and surrounding areas.
Web: redhillsfarmalliance.com/copy-of-seven-days-of-local-delight

Pie and pastry making class:  Chef Jessica Bright McMullen  presents a class on making pie crust plus an entree of a leek and onion pie (topped with creamy chèvre),  apple pie and drambuie pumpkin pie with cinnamon whipped cream and a  green salad. In addition to learning to make the pastry McMullen will also discuss pastry techniques including lattice and other embellishments.   $40. Call 850.264.2308.
When: 6 p.m. Nov. 7.
Where: KitchenAble Cooking School, Cottages on Lake Ella, 1635 N. Monroe Street
Web: kitchenable.net

Vine and Dine: 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe is hosting a Thanksgiving-themed wine pairing.  Owners Lynne and Bill Edwards will match five courses of traditional foods, from appetizers to pecan pie, with five types of wine.  Reservations required. $45. Call 850.765.7053.
When:  6:30 p.m. Nov. 10.
Where: 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe, 6265 Old Water Oak Road
Web: 319wineandcheese.com

Trolley service:  The city of Tallahassee is offering free trolley service connecting downtown with Cascades Park, College Town and Midtown so you can visit area restaurants without having to drive and hunt for parking spots.  Pick up buses outside City Hall or at stops along the routes (marked by signs). There’s also a free bus service Friday and Saturday nights running to those areas. Check the city website below for real-time information. WiFi provided.
When: Lunchtime service is from 11:45 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. Buses return to stops about every 20 minutes. Free nighttime trolleys operate through the three neighborhoods from 4:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Where: Cascades Park, College Town and Midtown. All include a stop outside City Hall, 300 S. Adams St.
Web:  talgov.com/gis/trolley/index.html

FLORIDA

For a list of festivals across the state, check out visitflorida.com/en-us/florida-events/calendar.html

WEEKLY EVENTS

Brains and brew:  Exercise your brain and drink locally brewed beer (responsibly, please) at  the weekly Trivia Night at Grasslands Brewing Company (call 850-765-3014 to ensure it’s going on, as planned).
When: 7  to 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays
Where: : GrassLands Brewing Company, 603 W. Gaines Street
Webgrasslandsbrewery.com

Brickyard Farmers Market:  This new farmers market, now located inside the Urban Food Market, features homemade jams and jellies, baked goods, produce, plants  and other items. 
When: 
8 a.m.  to 4 p.m. Saturdays.
Where: 
Urban Food Market, Tallahassee Centre, 2415 N Monroe Street
Web:
 centreoftallahassee.com

Craft beer tastings:  Lake Tribe Brewing Company offers weekly tastings and tours. The $10 fee includes a souvenir glass, six tasting tickets and a behind-the-scenes look at the brewery.
When: 2 to 4 p.m. Saturdays
Where: Lake Tribe Brewing Company, 3357 Garber Drive
Web: laketribebrewing.com

Craft beer Tuesday: Get discounts on a variety of brews at 319 Wine and Cheese.
When: 5 p.m.  Tuesdays
Where: 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe, 6265 Old Water Oak Road
Web319wineandcheese.com

Wine down Wednesdays: Order wine for $5 a glass during the weekly event.
When: 5 p.m.  Wednesdays.
Where: 319 Wine & Cheese Shoppe, 6265 Old Water Oak Road
Web: 319wineandcheese.com

Downtown Marketplace:  Check out fresh produce and food items, art and crafts by regional participants, live music and other attractions at this weekly event.
When: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays March through December.
Where: Ponce de Leon Park, Park Avenue and Monroe Street
Webdowntownmarket.com

Eastside Farmer’s Market:  Local producers bring fresh fruits and vegetables, plants, herbal teas, gifts, handmade soaps and more.
When: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.
Where: Luke’s Anglican Church, 3725 Apalachee Parkway
Web: facebook.com/eastsidefarmersmarkettallahassee

Food Truck Thursday:  No need to wait for the weekend to have some fun.  Stop by Food Truck Thursdays, with live music behind the Cottages at Lake Ella. Bring your lawn chairs, coolers, blankets and the whole family (dogs ok on a leash). Participating trucks subject to change.  Participating trucks may vary. Sponsored by the Tallahassee Food Truck Association and Lake Ella Merchants Association.
When: 6 to 9 p.m.  every Thursday. (Closed Aug. 3).
Where: behind the Cottages at Lake Ella, 1639 N. Monroe St.
WebTallahassee Food Truck Association

Frenchtown Farmers Market:  The weekly event features vendors selling handmade and locally grown products and produce plus eggs, honey, preserves and baked goods.
When: 9 .m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays
Where: 524 N. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Webfrenchtownheritage.org

Growers Market at Lake Ella:  Find fresh produce and other vendors at this weekly event.
When: 
Noon to 6 p.m. each Wednesday.
Where: 
The Growers’ Market, 229 Lake Ella Drive
Web: 
facebook.com/LakeEllaGrowersMarket

Lake Ella Sunday brunch:  Join the laid-back group enjoying the food trucks, live music and tranquil view of Lake Ella on Sunday mornings.
When: 11 a.m to 2 p.m. every Sunday.
Where:  The Shops at Lake Ella, 1641 N. Monroe St.
WebTallahassee Food Truck Association

Martini Mondays:  All martinis are $5 each at Brass Tap Midtown. There are eight martini choices, including the Chocoberry, Blackberry Lemon Drop and Passionfruit Martin.
When:  4 to midnight Mondays
Where: Brass Taps Midtown,  1321 Thomasville Road
Web: brasstapbeerbar.com

Tallahassee’s Farmers Market:  The longtime farmers market focuses on produce, offering “conventional, Certified Organic, Certified Naturally Grown, non-chemical, natural practices, hydroponics, growers and resellers.” Other items include  plants, flowers, honey, grass-fed beef and pork and cheese.
When: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays
Where: 1415 Timberlane Road at Market Square
Web: localharvest.org/tallahassee-farmers-market

Wednesday Roundup:  Get out of the office or the classroom and head to the Downtown Food Truck Court for a weekly lunch gathering.
When:  11 a.m. to 2 p.m.  every Wednesday.
Where: just off Gaines Street at 725 S Bronough St.
Web facebook.com/TallyFTA

Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic farm stand:  Harry Kimble of K & K Farms out of Quitman, Ga. sells produce, nuts and figs outside the clinic on Wednesdays and he also sells his goods at the Farmers’ Market  at Market Square on Saturday mornings. Kimble specializes in peaches, plums, nectarines and pecans. (The corn pictured comes from Kimble’s stand).
When: 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays 
Where:
Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic, 3334 Capital Medical Blvd.

You Make It, You Grow It: Local artisans, growers and producers and other items for sale at this bimonthly farmers market.
When: 11 a.m to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Saturday of the month
Where: Railroad Square Art Park, 602 McDonnell Drive
Web: facebook.com/youmakeit

Have a food/dining event you want to share? Send the info to TallahasseeTable@gmail.com at least two weeks in advance and we’ll try to get it posted here.